Blog
June 7, 2019, 8:00 AM

Winterboers in Haiti



LAST PICTUE BLOG

Market Rewards - The Last Day

This morning, we dedicated a classroom in the new primary school, in memory of Herman and LaVonne Winterboer. The students that will be in that classroom next fall sang songs and recited memorized prose about school. Cedric and Clayton mounted a plaque on the wall, then we sang one of LaVonne’s favorites, Jesus Loves Me. It was very inspiring to be a part of the growth at the School of Light.

 The trucks were loaded with 5 PET carts (Personal Energy Transport), and we were back on the road! The carts are designed to give mobility to those who can’t walk, but can use their arms and hands. Pre-screening is done to ensure that the recipient is a good candidate to receive the cart. We traveled for over 2 hours, over brand new roads, over some not-so-new roads, and actually crossed through 5 rivers! The sun was working hard today, too, so we looked for shade whenever possible. At each stop, carts were quickly assembled and some basic “drivers ed” instruction was given. The recipients are read an agreement, stating they will take care of their cart, and maintenance and repair are made available as necessary. After the agreement was signed, we sang a song in Creole, and prayed for the recipient and their family. One lady was getting the “keys” to her first “set of wheels” at age 79! Another lady took off down the street, and her mother was so thrilled! One place we couldn’t get to in the trucks, because the rains had washed out the road, and the yards near the house was a swamp! The young woman crawled across those swampy yards, on her badly crippled hands and knees, to get to her new cart. It was the single most humbling moment of the week for me. I was hot, and my backside was bruised from the rough ride, and I was feeling a little sorry for myself. Until I saw her running, in the only way she could, to a wooden tricycle with pedals on the handlebar. Her disabilities were birth defects, and that cart would allow her some independence, and mobility. And I was whining about being too hot. The shame washed over me with such weight, I had to bow my head and ask for forgiveness.

 

This is the same as the Seventh Blog with photos.

I am happy to report that the team arrived safely in Spencer about 5:30 this afternoon, weary from travel, but blessed beyond measure.  Thank you for your prayers.

 

Relaying for Him,

Dave.

As of 2:42 pm the Haiti Team is in Miami.  Continue to pray for them as they transition from 3rd world back to the United States!

 

Relaying for Him,

Dave.

BLOG 8

This morning, we dedicated a classroom in the new primary school, in memory of Herman and LaVonne Winterboer. The students that will be in that classroom next fall sang songs and recited memorized prose about school. Cedric and Clayton mounted a plaque on the wall, then we sang one of LaVonne’s favorites, Jesus Loves Me. It was very inspiring to be a part of the growth at the School of Light.

 

The trucks were loaded with 5 PET carts (Personal Energy Transport), and we were back on the road! The carts are designed to give mobility to those who can’t walk, but can use their arms and hands. Pre-screening is done to ensure that the recipient is a good candidate to receive the cart. We traveled for over 2 hours, over brand new roads, over some not-so-new roads, and actually crossed through 5 rivers! The sun was working hard today, too, so we looked for shade whenever possible. At each stop, carts were quickly assembled and some basic “drivers ed” instruction was given. The recipients are read an agreement, stating they will take care of their cart, and maintenance and repair are made available as necessary. After the agreement was signed, we sang a song in Creole, and prayed for the recipient and their family. One lady was getting the “keys” to her first “set of wheels” at age 79! Another lady took off down the street, and her mother was so thrilled! One place we couldn’t get to in the trucks, because the rains had washed out the road, and the yards near the house was a swamp! The young woman crawled across those swampy yards, on her badly crippled hands and knees, to get to her new cart. It was the single most humbling moment of the week for me. I was hot, and my backside was bruised from the rough ride, and I was feeling a little sorry for myself. Until I saw her running, in the only way she could, to a wooden tricycle with pedals on the handlebar. Her disabilities were birth defects, and that cart would allow her some independence, and mobility. And I was whining about being too hot. The shame washed over me with such weight, I had to bow my head and ask for forgiveness.

 

Tonight, as we start to pack up, and we’re reflecting on our week, we’re all tired, but it’s a good tired. We’ve worked hard, but we’ve spent time with so many wonderful Haitians, who, despite their hardships, are truly, truly joyful. We could certainly take a lesson from them on gratitude! We came with the intent of blessing others, but I know we were blessed in return tenfold! Next time you see one of us, and you ask “How was Haiti?”, give us a minute to put it into words.

 

Thank you for the prayers for our team! We’re excited to fly back to the US tomorrow, and head home on Friday. Bondye bon! God is good!

This is the Sixth Blog (6/11/19) with pictures. 

 Fruits of our labors 

Another sunny day in Haiti! We loaded up the trucks with shovels and buckets and headed to a nursery. We picked up dozens of saplings that will grow into mango, papaya, cashew, coconut and citron trees. Families who participate in the First Thousand Days Program (aka PMJ – Premye Mil Jou) are eligible to receive these trees. We planted ten trees at 5 houses, which was hot and buggy work, but thanks the rains last night, the ground was easy to dig up! The papaya trees will be mature enough to bear fruit in just 6 months, and feed their family for years! We prayed at each house that the trees would mature and bear fruit, and that the families would see God’s hand right there in their backyards.

A second coat of paint for the trim was needed at the new school, so the team finished that project this afternoon. Many hands donated money, supplies, and labor to Many Hands to see this project to completion. It’s exciting to think of the students that will be using that building this fall!

We loaded the trucks with treats and toys and went to visit our good friend, Pastor Francois. He heads a church, a school and an orphanage in Pignon. He is always so gracious to receive us in his home, and share his thoughts and wisdom. Then we played with the kids! Carol blew bubbles. Maddie painted little girls’ fingernails. Mike played ball. Clayton played tic-tac-toe. Karmen and Calista twirled the jump rope. Christi rode her unicycle! And the kids laughed and played and hugged and smiled for all the cell phones cameras! Curt and Mike had little ones fall asleep in their arms. It might have been the happiest hour of the week.

Tonight at supper, we admitted that we’re tired and sore. We’re a little homesick, and looking forward to heading home soon. Most of us have done more physical labor than we’re used to, and since several of us do qualify for AARP benefits, it’s no surprise that we’re a little tuckered out.

But I know why. Because our bodies are sore and tired, we’re ready to get back home. Back to our normal schedules, our Sealy Posturpedics, and our familiar surroundings. If our backs weren’t sore, if our knees weren’t stiff, our hearts couldn’t bear the leaving. To visit Haiti is to love the Haitians. In addition to fresh paint and new trees, we’ll leave behind pieces of our hearts.

 

BLOG 7

I think we hit the jackpot tonight...or they are playing catch-up with the photos from Haiti!  This is the Third Blog 6/8/2019.

Enjoy...Dave.

From market to mountaintop with rainbows and reminders:

Saturday is Market Day in Pignon! Picture a huge flea market and farmers market rolled together. With clothing and housewares, fresh fruits and vegetables, livestock, fresh bread and meat, all sitting out in the sun. You pass a stall with fresh spices and the aromas make your mouth water. The next stall has freshly butchered goat, complete with the skinned head, and the aromas make your eyes water. I’m exaggerating a little, but it is a very different way to buy groceries. Laundry soap is sold by the scoop from a big bowl. Rice and beans are scooped out of huge bags. And since many come to the market for the day, some stalls served food, prepared on site. Kind of like food row at the county fair. Kind of. It’s a great way to understand more of Haitian life, and interact with the people. It’s also a good reminder of how incredibly blessed we are, with huge, clean grocery stores, with none of the food being sold off the ground.

As we were leaving the market, we ran into a friend of Maren’s, a man named Dodo. He is a PET cart recipient, and Maren met him in 2014. They have kept in touch through Many Hands, and have prayed for each other since then. We heard he was getting baptized on Sunday, so we brought him a new set of church clothes. We’re going to attend the service tomorrow, and we’re very excited to watch his public profession of faith.

Next, we packed a picnic lunch and went to Basin Zim, a beautiful waterfall. Along the way, we drove over brand new stretches of road, one part actually had asphalt! Better roads will definitely make life in Haiti better, and it was a much smoother ride for the Iowans riding in the back of the tap-taps! Most of the team climbed up the mountain to see the waterfall from above, and found an area where they could escape the heat under a smaller falls. The cold water on the freshly sunburnt skin was breathtaking! As was the view. Due to recent rains, the foliage was thick and green, and the sunshine made rainbows in the water spray. In the midst of the sadness and poverty, God’s artistry and presence was in living color before us. Many local young men were waiting to earn a little money, and help with the climb up the steep mountain. Before we left, one of our helpers asked if we could pray as a group, and he led the prayer. It was a wonderful moment, at the end of a wonderful afternoon, with the reminder that we aren’t bringing God to Haiti. He is already here.

 

On a personal note…it’s less tragic than losing your passport, or your wedding ring, but it’s still pretty upsetting to lose your cell phone. Mine was not new or fancy, but I had just finished the 2-year contract, and now I’ll have to ask for everyone’s phone numbers again! First world problems, right? The tragic part is losing the pictures I’ve been taking here in Haiti. Several on our team are taking pictures, and I know they’ll share, but you know…it’s not the same. On the ride back from the waterfall, I quit crying about it, and tried to process it from a practical point of view. I’ll call my husband and have him contact Verizon to cancel the line. I lived for 34 years without one, I can survive another week. I have the means with which to get a new one. Ok. Not tragic. Then I wondered, would I have been as upset if I’d lost my Bible? I own several, all with sentimental attachment , but if I’m honest, I don’t know if I would have cried. Please forgive me, Lord. Thank you for this reminder of what to truly value.

Fruits of our labors

 

Another sunny day in Haiti! We loaded up the trucks with shovels and buckets and headed to a nursery. We picked up dozens of saplings that will grow into mango, papaya, cashew, coconut and citron trees. Families who participate in the First Thousand Days Program (aka PMJ - Premye Mil Jou) are eligible to receive these trees. We planted ten trees at 5 houses, which was hot and buggy work, but thanks the rains last night, the ground was easy to dig up! The mango trees will be mature enough to bear fruit in just 6 months, and feed their family for years! We prayed at each house that the trees would mature and bear fruit, and that the families would see God’s hand right there in their backyards.

 

A second coat of paint for the trim was needed at the new school, so the team finished that project this afternoon. Many hands donated money, supplies, and labor to Many Hands to see this project to completion. It’s exciting to think of the students that will be using that building this fall!

 

We loaded the trucks with treats and toys and went to visit our good friend, Pastor Francois. He heads a church, a school and an orphanage in Pignon. He is always so gracious to receive us in his home, and share his thoughts and wisdom. Then we played with the kids! Carol blew bubbles. Maddie painted little girls’ fingernails. Mike played ball. Clayton played tic-tac-toe. Karmen and Calista twirled the jump rope. Christi rode her unicycle! And the kids laughed and played and hugged and smiled for all the cell phones cameras! Curt and Mike had little ones fall asleep in their arms. It might have been the happiest hour of the week.

 

Tonight at supper, we admitted that we’re tired and sore. We’re a little homesick, and looking forward to heading home soon. Most of us have done more physical labor than we’re used to, and since several of us do qualify for AARP benefits, it’s no surprise that we’re a little tuckered out.

 

But I know why. Because our bodies are sore and tired, we’re ready to get back home. Back to our normal schedules, our Sealy Posturpedics, and our familiar surroundings. If our backs weren’t sore, if our knees weren’t stiff, our hearts couldn’t bear the leaving. To visit Haiti is to love the Haitians. In addition to fresh paint and new trees, we’ll leave behind pieces of our hearts.

 

Lori

 

Praise God from Whom all blessings flow

This morning we put on our church clothes, and drove to the country church where Craig and Christi worship. First, we had a short Sunday School lesson from the pastor. Occasionally we would catch a word, like “Jezi” (Jesus), but for the most part, we didn’t understand anything…until Pastor Lumenes said “Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego”. Then we could imagine what the rest of the lesson entailed! The church service started with praise and worship, and we sang the Doxology! In Kreyole and English, pews full of Christians were worshipping together! Haitian church is so full of life and enthusiasm, you can’t help but be uplifted!

After church, we went into Pignon to a restaurant, and shared a delicious meal of chicken legs, rice, beet salad, spicy cole slaw, and fried plantains.

We loaded up the truck with bags of blessings for the poorest of the poor, and more of the families that have relationships with the Many Hands volunteers. The bags of food included: rice, beans, spaghetti, beef bullion cubes, and we added a gallon of cooking oil for each family. Gifts of clothing and toys were also distributed to special friends. We prayed with every family, and every one of them expressed their gratitude for all the blessings they had received from God. It rained on us, and we got really, really muddy, but again, it was so uplifting! Every time we stopped to visit a family to bless THEM, they blessed US!

Praise God from Whom all blessings flow. Blessings that rain down on us.
Praise Him all creatures here below. Creatures of all nations.
Praise Him above ye heavenly host. The heavens rejoiced with us today!
Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Lwanj pou Bondye Papa, pitit li Jezi Kris, e Sentespri a.

Amen. Amen.

NOTE: This is the Forth Blog 6/9/19 with photos...

 

Relaying for Him,

Dave.

BLOG 6

 

Market Rewards – Blessings and Backaches

The Market Rewards team visiting Haiti from Spencer, IA is made up of both newcomers and old friends. The joys of such a team is in shared perspectives and relationships. The first-time visitors remind the “veterans” of the wonder of Haiti while the returning members can introduce the team to relationships that have been years in the making. Such is the case this week. Read below to see their experiences.

Today we grabbed shovels and buckets, donned our work gloves and blessed two families with concrete floors. Kurt, Kim, Emily, Abby and Caitlyn Weeks went to one house, and the rest of the team went to a larger house. The Haitians mixed the gravel, cement and water, then we passed buckets like a fire brigade. Most of us aren’t used to that kind of physical labor, but we dug in and switched places when needed. Some ibuprofen may be needed later! The concrete floors are so necessary, keeping dirt and bacteria out of food that is sometimes stored on the floor. We always pray that the concrete will give the family a physical foundation, and be a reminder of the foundation we can have in Jesus Christ.

After a delicious lunch…and may I just say, if you haven’t been to Haiti because you’re worried about the food, you are missing out! The cooks, Beatrice and Evonne are fantastic! So, after lunch, we loaded up and headed out with food and gifts for some of the families with which our team has special connections. Calista made friends with a little girl, named Mozena, 10 years ago. Every trip, Calista brings food and gifts, and reminds Mozena that God loves her. Calista keeps a photo album with pictures of their hands together, and it’s a visual reminder of their relationship, as well as a “growth chart” of sorts.

Next we visited Elianne, another old friend. We gave her rice and beans, cooking oil, beef buillion cubes, spaghetti and soap. She is 70-80 years old, mostly deaf, has a bad foot, and is the happiest person I have ever met. She hugs and kisses every member of the team, and shouts to the skies, “Praise God for my visitors!” We prayed for her and her daughter, and at the end, she waved her arms enthusiastically, shouting “AMEN”! Our intent was to bless her, but I walked away feeling like I had received the blessing.

Lastly, we visited Jack-Nayson, a 4-year old being sponsored by the Weeks family. This was their first face-to-face meeting, and it was so fun to watch the introductions. Clothing, shoes, and toys were presented to Jack, as well as food for the family. We all prayed together, and it will be exciting to watch him, and their relationship, grow.

Establishing these very personal connections, makes the trip so meaningful. These are friends, even extended family, to us. To be able to give them food and pray for them, is why we’re here. But knowing that many of them are praying for us, too, is a blessing beyond my ability to describe.

Thank you for your continued prayers. We’re tired, but we’re healthy and safe. May God bless us all.

NOTE:  This is the Second Blog 6/7/19 with pictures published on the web site on 6/9/19.  I am sending the blogs through as I receive them and will try to catch all of the blogs with photos (which always come later) and will pass them on to you. 

 

Relaying for Him!

Dave.

 

Praise the Lord and pass the paint

 

We started the day with devotions with the Many Hands staff. They gather each weekday morning, for prayer, Scripture and to wish each other blessings for a good day! How cool would it be to work where the first thing you and your co-workers do each day, is to pray for and encourage each other! You can’t help but have a good day!

 

With leaders and brushes in hand, we worked on painting the trim on the new elementary school. We had Long, Tall, Clayton on the big ladder to reach the top of the walls! We had Calista and Christina painting the straight lines! Everybody lent a hand, as we painted walls, pillars, fascia, and windows. We had Christian music playing, and “Many Hands made light work!”

 

After lunch, we had a short class on the history of Haiti. We heard a lot of the circumstances and reasons why Haiti is in the economic crisis that it is. Their story has not always been a happy one, but their future has the potential to be brighter. One success story we heard was from a Haitian man who had been hired by Many Hands to help with the concrete floors. With the money he made, he said he had been able to buy a house! Others had started their own business! Praise the Lord!

 

Next, part of the team went back to paint, and the rest went on a tour of the Agronomy Department and to visit the goat farm. So exciting to see the growth in both of these areas! 

 

Just as we were getting ready to pray before supper, the heavens opened up, and it has been pouring rain for about an hour. The downpour on the metal roof made it next to impossible to hear Cedric give the blessing, but we trusted in his words, and all said amen! This much rain, coming down so hard and fast, makes the roads almost impossible to navigate. Some of the Many Hands staff can’t get home until it stops. A lady selling charcoal walked miles to get here, with her infant in her arms, and is now waiting on the porch, hoping the rain stops.

 

It was a hot and sweaty day. We worked hard, and we’re tired. But we had a delicious supper of rice and beans and goat stew, and we’ve all showered. We’re listening to the rain and reflecting on our day, and we’re thankful. Thankful for the opportunities to learn more about Haiti and Many Hands. Thankful for the work we were able to do, and the progress we’re seeing. Thankful for the music and the fun we shared today. Thankful for the family groups represented on the team, and for the new friendships we’ve forged.

 

And we’re thankful for our friends and family who we know are praying for and with us.

 

Thanks again, Dad!  Love to all.

BLOG 5

Thanks for all the prayers!  . Miss you all!

Lori

 

Praise God from Whom all blessings flow

 

We put on our church clothes, and drove to the country church where Craig and Christi this morning. First, we had a short Sunday School lesson from the pastor. Occasionally we would catch a word, like “Jezi” (Jesus), but for the most part, we didn’t understand anything...until Pastor Lumenes said “Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego”. Then we could imagine what the rest of the lesson entailed! The church service started with praise and worship, and we sang the Doxology! In Kreyole and English, pews full of Christians were worshipping together! Haitian church is so full of life and enthusiasm, you can’t help but be uplifted!

 

After church, we went into Pignon to a restaurant, and shared a delicious meal of chicken legs, rice, beet salad, spicy cole slaw, and fried plantains.

 

We loaded up the truck with bags of blessings for the poorest of the poor, and more of the families that have relationships with the Many Hands volunteers. The bags of food included: rice, beans, spaghetti, beef bullion cubes, and we added a gallon of cooking oil for each family. Gifts of clothing and toys were also distributed to special friends. We prayed with every family, and every one of them expressed their gratitude for all the blessings they had received from God.   It rained on us, and we got really, really muddy, but again, it was so uplifting! Every time we stopped to visit a family to bless THEM, they blessed US!

 

Praise God from Whom all blessings flow. Blessings that rain down on us.

Praise Him all creatures here below. Creatures of all nations.

Praise Him above ye heavenly host. The heavens rejoiced with us today!

Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Lwanj pou Bondye Papa, pitit li Jezi Kris, e Sentespri a.

 

Amen. Amen.

BLOG 4

From market to mountaintop with rainbows and reminders

 

Saturday is Market Day in Pignon! Picture a huge flea market and farmers market rolled together. With clothing and housewares, fresh fruits and vegetables, livestock, fresh bread and meat, all sitting out in the sun. You pass a stall with fresh spices and the aromas make your mouth water. The next stall has freshly butchered goat, complete with the skinned head, and the aromas make your eyes water. I’m exaggerating a little, but it is a very different way to buy groceries. Laundry soap is sold by the scoop from a big bowl. Rice and beans are scooped out of huge bags. And since many come to the market for the day, some stalls served food, prepared on site. Kind of like food row at the county fair. Kind of. It’s a great way to understand more of Haitian life, and interact with the people. It’s also a good reminder of how incredibly blessed we are, with huge, clean grocery stores, with none of the food being sold off the ground.

 

As we were leaving the market, we ran into a friend of Maren’s, a man named Dodo. He is a PET cart recipient, and Maren met him in 2014. They have kept in touch through Many Hands, and have prayed for each other since then. We heard he was getting baptized on Sunday, so we brought him a new set of church clothes. We’re going to attend the service tomorrow, and we’re very excited to watch his public profession of faith.

 

Next, we packed a picnic lunch and went to Basin Zim, a beautiful waterfall. Along the way, we drove over brand new stretches of road, one part actually had asphalt! Better roads will definitely make life in Haiti better, and it was a much smoother ride for the Iowans riding in the back of the tap-taps! Most of the team climbed up the mountain to see the waterfall from above, and found an area where they could escape the heat under a smaller falls. The cold water on the freshly sunburnt skin was breathtaking! As was the view. Due to recent rains, the foliage was thick and green, and the sunshine made rainbows in the water spray. In the midst of the sadness and poverty, God’s artistry and presence was in living color before us. Many local young men were waiting to earn a little money, and help with the climb up the steep mountain. Before we left, one of our helpers asked if we could pray as a group, and he led the prayer. It was a wonderful moment, at the end of a wonderful afternoon, with the reminder that we aren’t bringing God to Haiti. He is already here.

 

On a personal note...it’s less tragic than losing your passport, or your wedding ring, but it’s still pretty upsetting to lose your cell phone. Mine was not new or fancy, but I had just finished the 2-year contract, and now I’ll have to ask for everyone’s phone numbers again! First world problems, right? The tragic part is losing the pictures I’ve been taking here in Haiti. Several on our team are taking pictures, and I know they’ll share, but you know...it’s not the same. On the ride back from the waterfall, I quit crying about it, and tried to process it from a practical point of view. I’ll call my husband and have him contact Verizon to cancel the line. I lived for 34 years without one, I can survive another week. I have the means with which to get a new one. Ok. Not tragic. Then I wondered, would I have been as upset if I’d lost my Bible? I own several, all with sentimental attachment , but if I’m honest, I don’t know if I would have cried. Please forgive me, Lord. Thank you for this reminder of what to truly value.

 

Lori Taylor

BLOG 3

Dave.

Blessings and backaches

 

Today we grabbed shovels and buckets, donned our work gloves and blessed two families with concrete floors. Kurt, Kim, Emily, Abby and Caitlyn Weeks went to one house, and the rest of the team went to a larger house. The Haitians mixed the gravel, cement and water, then we passed buckets like a fire brigade. Most of us aren’t used to that kind of physical labor, but we dug in and switched places when needed. Some ibuprofen may be needed later! The concrete floors are so necessary, keeping dirt and bacteria out of food that is sometimes stored on the floor. We always pray that the concrete will give the family a physical foundation, and be a reminder of the foundation we can have in Jesus Christ.

 

After a delicious lunch...and may I just say, if you haven’t been to Haiti because you’re worried about the food, you are missing out! The cooks, Beatrice and Evonne and fantastic! So, after lunch, we loaded up and headed out with food and gifts for some of the families with which our team has special connections. Calista made friends with a little girl, named Mozena, 10 years ago. Every trip, Calista brings food and gifts, and reminds Mozena that God loves her. Calista keeps a photo album with pictures of their hands together, and it’s a visual reminder of their relationship, as well as a “growth chart” of sorts. 

 

Next we visited Elianne, another old friend. We gave her rice and beans, cooking oil, beef buillion cubes, spaghetti and soap. She is 70-80 years old, mostly deaf, has a bad foot, and is the happiest person I have ever met. She hugs and kisses every member of the team, and shouts to the skies, “Praise God for my visitors!” We prayed for her and her daughter, and at the end, she waved her arms enthusiastically, shouting “AMEN”! Our intent was to bless her, but I walked away feeling like I had received the blessing.

 

Lastly, we visited Jack-Nayson, a 4-year old being sponsored by the Weeks family. This was their first face-to-face meeting, and it was so fun to watch the introductions. Clothing, shoes, and toys were presented to Jack, as well as food for the family. We all prayed together, and it will be exciting to watch him, and their relationship, grow.

 

Establishing these very personal connections, makes the trip so meaningful. These are friends, even extended family, to us. To be able to give them food and pray for them, is why we’re here. But knowing that many of them are praying for us, too, is a blessing beyond my ability to describe.

 

Thank you for your continued prayers. We’re tired, but we’re healthy and safe. May God bless us all.

 

Love to all!  Lori

BLOG 2

 

 

Firsts and Lasts

Today was, for some, their first time in Haiti. Their first time to ride in a WW II cargo plane. Their first time to visit an open air market. The first time riding in the back of a pickup. (Ok, maybe not with this group of Iowans.). And those first timers had a lot of questions. Questions about the people, the food, the exotic fruits and vegetables not recognized at the market, and about Haitian life in general. Answers to those questions often came from the veterans, and started with “The last time we were here…”. Teammates shared stories from past trips, with laughs and advice from lessons learned. Those who have been here before, were reminded of the wonder of seeing Haiti for the first time, and might have seen new things, too.

We were all excited to see the staff, and local friends of Many Hands. We were excited to see the new campus at Maliarette, and we prayed with, and for, the new staff. We were glad to bring peanut butter from the US, as well as clothing and other needed supplies and gifts. It was an exciting first day!

The afternoon was also full of reminders why we are here. Reminding us why we brought vitamin drops for the babies. Reminding us why we’ll deliver bags of rice and beans. Reminding us that we have answered the call to be the hands and feet of Jesus. Whether we are 17 or 70, on our first trip, or our last, this team was moved by the Holy Spirit to come to Haiti. We are here to share God’s love and mercy, and His forgiveness that is offered to every last one of us. Our first night, we should all sleep well, and we’ll be refreshed and refueled for tomorrow’s firsts.

I was asked to include the photos, which did not get published until this afternoon, so I am sending the first blog again, this time with pictures.

Relaying for Him,

Dave.

BLOG 1

Firsts and lasts

 

Today was, for some, their first time in Haiti.  Their first time to ride in a WW II cargo plane.  Their first time to visit an open air market.  The first time riding in the back of a pickup.  (Ok, maybe not with this group of Iowans.). And those first timers had a lot of questions.  Questions about the people, the food, the exotic fruits and vegetables not recognized at the market, and about Haitian life in general.  Answers to those questions often came from the veterans, and started with “The last time we were here...”. Team mates shared stories from past trips, with laughs and advice from lessons learned.  Those who have been here before, were reminded of the wonder of seeing Haiti for the first time, and might have seen new things, too.  We were all excited to see the staff, and local friends of Many Hands.  We were excited to see the new campus at Maliarette, and we prayed with, and for, the new staff.  We were glad to bring peanut butter from the US, as well as clothing and other needed supplies and gifts.  It was an exciting first day!  The afternoon was also full of reminders why we are here. Reminding us why we brought vitamin drops for the babies.  Reminding us why we’ll deliver bags of rice and beans.  Reminding us that we have answered the call to be the hands and feet of Jesus.  Whether we are 17 or 70, on our first trip, or our last, this team was moved by the Holy Spirit to come to Haiti.  We are here to share God’s love and mercy, and His forgiveness that is offered to every last one of us.  Our first night, we should all sleep well, and we’ll be refreshed and refueled for tomorrow’s firsts.  

 

--

Micah Aurand
Administrative Coordinator
Many Hands for Haiti

 

 

** Note:  After leaving on Wednesday at about 0-dark:30, the team spent the night in Florida and flew to Haiti this morning (Thursday).  They arrived in Pignon about 10:45 (Iowa time).

 

Relaying for Him,

 

 

 




June 29, 2018, 12:00 AM

Pastor Terry Plocher's Blog